Chicago Police DepartmentGeneral Order G05-03
Critical Incident Response Program
Issue Date:07 December 2017Effective Date:07 December 2017
Rescinds:27 December 1999 Version G05-03 and S05-03
Index Category:Extraordinary Responses
I.Purpose
This directive:
  • A.provides information about the Critical Incident Response Program and response procedures.
  • B.continues the Critical Incident Response Program.
  • C.satisfies CALEA Law Enforcement Standard Chapter 46.
II.Policy
  • A.In the event of a critical incident, the Department:
    • 1.will respond in a systematic, proactive approach consistent with the National Incident Management System (NIMS); assess and contain the situation; ensure that any further threat is neutralized; protect the lives of the public whether threatened by assailant(s), civil disobedience, terrorist incidents, or natural/man-made disasters; and secure medical aid for those injured.
    • 2.will follow a framework approach to mitigate critical incidents using the NIMS unified incident command system. This is based on the recognition that while many incidents may appear different (e.g., active shooter incidents and hazardous material incidents) they may be mitigated using the same basic procedures.
    • 3.may serve as the Incident Command, as part of the Unified Command Group (as appropriate), and/or in a support role.
  • B.In order to ensure proper preparedness and an effective response to homeland security-related critical incidents, Department members of the designated command authority for homeland security-related matters will follow the guidelines set forth in the Department directives entitled "Homeland Security Preparedness" and "Homeland Security Operational Response."
  • C.The Chicago Fire Department (CFD) is the lead agency and has the ultimate authority in all critical incidents , hazardous material incidents , and disaster scenes not involving an active criminal threat. The Fire Department's responsibilities are fire suppression and investigation, search and rescue operations, triage, treatment & transport; assist in population protection; and mitigate hazardous material incidents. CFD has the overall command of the following types of incidents:
    • 1.hazardous materials;
    • 2.firefighting;
    • 3.disasters (natural and man-made); and
    • 4.search and rescues.
  • D.When the Fire Department is the lead agency, the ranking on-site CFD supervisor is responsible for the coordination of all fire and police activities. The Chicago Police Department will:
    • 1.provide support to the Chicago Fire Department.
    • 2.cooperate with governmental agencies which have an official interest in the incident (e.g., Illinois Emergency Management Agency, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Health, etc.).
    • 3.provide support services to government agencies that are determined to have primary responsibility in cases of concurrent jurisdiction (e.g., Federal Bureau of Investigation).
  • E.The Chicago Police Department (CPD) is the lead agency for critical incidents involving an active criminal threat. The Department's responsibilities are providing law enforcement, public safety and security, rescue and recovery, and population protection services. CPD has the overall command of the following types of incidents:
    • 1.human-caused hazards (active Shooter, terrorism, unexploded device);
    • 2.prevention and protection; and
    • 3.City evacuation.
  • F.The Office of Emergency Management and Communication will:
    • 1.coordinate the response to critical incidents ; and
    • 2.make public notifications for awareness and safety, including but not limited to:
      • a.response to threats when lives are in imminent danger,
      • b.public sheltering and containment of the incident, and
      • c.any necessary information for public evacuation.
  • G.The Incident Commander will be the highest-ranking on-site Department member responsible for CPD's overall response to a critical incident. During a major critical incident, the Incident Commander will coordinate with ranking on-site CFD supervisor and the Office of Emergency Management and Communication (OEMC), and consult the City of Chicago's Emergency Operations Plan.
  • H.As soon as it becomes apparent, any conflict of opinion between the Incident Commander and the ranking on-site CFD supervisor will be addressed through respective chains of command for resolution.
III.General Information
  • A.A disaster or hazardous material incident may be caused by natural phenomenon, accident, or criminal act. Regardless of the cause, the handling of all critical incidents will follow the guidelines set forth in this directive and the procedure detailed in the Department directive entitled "Hazardous Material Incidents," when applicable.
  • B.In the case of a deployment of a weapon of mass destruction (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or explosive/incendiary) there may be no advance warning of what agent was dispersed into the environment. However, these incidents share all of the basic elements of a traditional haz-mat incident and will be handled in accordance with this directive and the procedure detailed in the Department directive entitled "Hazardous Material Incidents." Furthermore, Department members will:
  • C.Critical Incidents involving the threatened deployment of weapons of mass destruction will follow the procedures established in the Department directive entitled "Bomb Incidents" and this directive.
  • D.Critical Incidents involving an active shooter will follow the procedures established in the Department directive entitled "Active Shooter Incident Plan" and this directive.
  • E.Department members who encounter haz-mat incidents must immediately take into account the dynamics of the environment affected. An incident within a fixed structure or subway tunnel does not mean the situation is contained; these types of locations have ventilation shafts, elevator shafts, and may have airways or passages which connect to other buildings, locations within the structure or outside of the structure. All incidents have a downwind side.
  • F.For large scale emergencies which require the use of additional Department personnel, Department members will refer to the the procedures delineated in the Department directive entitled "Special Response Plans."
NOTE:
When the Critical Incident Response Program does not need to be implemented, Department members will follow any applicable procedures for the specific incident.
IV.Critical Incident Response Program
The Chief, Bureau of Patrol, will be responsible for the Chicago Police Department's overall management of the Critical Incident Response Program. In this capacity, the Chief, Bureau of Patrol, will be responsible for:
  • A.identifying pertinent training issues and will:
    • 1.coordinate with the commanding officer, Bomb Squad, to ensure continual information is gathered relative to weapons of mass destruction and haz-mat incidents.
    • 2.coordinate with the Deputy Chief, Education and Training Division to ensure the appropriate level of training and dissemination of information is conducted and maintained. The Education and Training Division will conduct and document annual training for the Critical Incident Response Program for Department members.
    • 3.ensure the adequate training of all field personnel to a minimum of the awareness level, including units within the Special Functions Division that are likely to be involved in critical incidents as first responders (e.g., Airport Law Enforcement Section, Public Transportation Section, Special Weapons and Tactics, etc.).
    • 4.ensure the SWAT commanding officer conducts an annual review of the Department's Critical Incident Response Program directive and training needs. The review will be documented in a To-From-Subject report directed to the Chief, Bureau of Patrol, with an attention to the Deputy Chief, Special Functions Division and the Director, Research and Development Division.
    • 5.ensure that SWAT team members are trained and equipped to function as secondary responders at designated critical incidents and are trained to respond as specialists with the capability to execute their functions while utilizing personal protective equipment (PPE).
    • 6.coordinate with the commanding officer, Bomb Squad, to ensure training for explosive technicians to respond as specialists, with the capability to execute their function in hostile environments utilizing PPE .
  • B.all administrative functions including:
    • 1.ensuring that an appropriate supply of PPE is obtained and that members are given the proper written instructions for use and care of each piece of equipment upon completion of training and issuance of the equipment.
    • 2.supplying rosters of trained and equipped secondary responders each police period to the commanding officer of the SWAT team and to the Crime Prevention and Information Center (CPIC).
    • 3.directing the Critical Incident Coordinator to conduct a documented quarterly inspection for operational readiness of equipment designated for use in support of the Critical Incident Response Program, including program members' PPE and breathing apparatuses to ensure proper fit and viability of the device for a fifteen minute period of time. All malfunctions will be reported to the Deputy Chief, Special Functions Division.
    • 4.monitoring the program administration and taking measures to correct deficiencies.
    • 5.submitting an annual report to the First Deputy Superintendent. The written report will be submitted through channels by 31 January of each year and will include:
      • a.a summary of training conducted relating to the Critical Incident Response Program during the previous year.
      • b.a projection of anticipated training for the current year.
      • c.a summary of all implementations of the Critical Incident Response Program or utilization of its resources over the previous year.
      • d.an evaluation of current equipment performance and needs, which will include a projection of budgetary needs for the following year.
V.Implementing of the Critical Incident Response Program
The Critical Incident Response Program may be invoked:
  • A.automatically when the CFD Incident Commander declares that a Level 3 haz-mat incident exists; or
  • B.upon the order of the Superintendent; the First Deputy Superintendent; the Chief, Bureau of Patrol; the on-duty Street Deputy; or any Deputy Chief, Bureau of Patrol.
VI.Chain of Command
  • A.When the highest rank on scene is represented by members from multiple Department Bureaus, the Incident Commander will be the ranking member from the Bureau of Patrol.
  • B.If the highest rank is represented by members from multiple Bureaus and Patrol does not have a member present of this rank, the ranking member will be the Bureau with tactical responsibility.
  • C.For critical incidents where the Department is the lead agency, the Incident Commander will be determined by:
    • 1.the Superintendent; or
    • 2.the First Deputy Superintendent; or will be
    • 3.the highest ranking Department member on scene.
    NOTE:
    Unless otherwise directed, the ultimate responsibility for the incident response lies with the Street Deputy.
  • D.For incidents where the Department is not the lead agency, the Department member of the appropriate rank will coordinate the response of the Chicago Police Department at the direction of the ranking on-site CFD supervisor who retains the ultimate responsibility for the incident.
VII.Procedures
  • A.Notifications
    • 1.In addition to the procedures detailed in the Department directive entitled "Hazardous Material (HAZ-MAT) Incidents," OEMC will notify CPIC whenever a Level 2 or Level 3 haz-mat incident is declared.
    • 2.Upon the declaration of a Level 2 haz-mat incident, CPIC will notify the commanding officer, SWAT.
    • 3.The commanding officer, SWAT will assign a supervisor trained in critical incident management to respond and assist the Incident Commander and ranking on-site CFD supervisor at the Level 2 haz-mat incident.
    • 4.If deemed appropriate, the Incident Commander will contact CPIC to request the appropriate command level authorization for the implementation of the Critical Incident Response Program if the required command level supervisor is not on the scene.
    • 5.Upon notification of a Level 3 haz-mat declaration, CPIC will notify and direct the SWAT team to implement the Critical Incident Response Program. CPIC will ensure information about the incident, access route , and mobilization area is relayed to responding personnel.
    • 6.Should the incident occur when SWAT team members are not normally available, or manpower needs exceed the resources available from on-duty personnel, the call up system may be invoked with authorization from the Street Deputy, the First Deputy Superintendent, or the Superintendent.
    • 7.OEMC will dispatch a canine unit to the mobilization area .
    • 8.OEMC will forward requests for specialist secondary responders through CPIC. CPIC will be responsible for the notifications to the appropriately trained and equipped specialists.
    • 9.Department members will vigilantly monitor radio communications for changes in the situation which might affect their posts. In addition, Department members will notify OEMC and the Incident Commander of any observed changes in conditions and be prepared to take the appropriate actions.
  • B.Critical Incident Response Teams
    • 1.SWAT team members assigned to field duties will ensure that specialized Department issued PPE is immediately available.
    • 2.Upon being notified that a Critical Incident Response Program has been implemented, SWAT team members will immediately proceed to the mobilization area by way of the advised route and stand by.
    • 3.Upon arrival at the scene, the Critical Incident Coordinator will seek out the Incident Commander and assist in the implementation of the Critical Incident Response Program.
    • 4.The first SWAT team supervisor on the scene will seek out the Incident Commander and/or the ranking on-site CFD supervisor and:
      • a.determine that the mobilization area is safe and the access route was correct and notify responding units of any change.
      • b.ascertain the role for SWAT team members.
      • c.brief SWAT team members on their function and ensure that the proper color signals are being employed:
        • (1)Red - High haz-mat threat level. Personnel should don their PPE and be masked and taped prior to leaving the mobilization area .
        • (2)Blue - Potential haz-mat threat level. Personnel should don their PPE , but carry respirator and tape with them when they exit the mobilization area .
        • (3)Yellow - Low haz-mat threat level. Personnel need not don PPE , but should carry their equipment bags with them when they exit the mobilization area .
        • (4)Green - No protective equipment needed. Deployment will be for other police purposes, PPE should be left in the mobilization area .
      • d.give proper consideration and instructions for the application of the buddy system to operations within the restricted zone .
      • e.ensure that personnel are deployed in accordance with the instructions received from the Incident Commander .
VIII.Initial Scene Response
  • A.Location Plat
    The following plat illustrates the positional relationship of the defined locations. In application, the Incident Commander or the ranking on-site CFD supervisor is at liberty to tailor these locations to suit the dynamics of the situation.
    Access Route ; Casualty Collection Point ; Decontamination Area ; EMS Triage Area ; Family Briefing Area ; Forward Command Post ; Hot Zone ; Inner Perimeter ; Isolated Area ; Media Briefing Area ; Mobilization Area ; Outer Perimeter ; Command Post ; Restricted Zone ; Safe Area ; Semi-Circle Buffer ; Victim Area ;
  • B.Functions
    • 1.Evaluate - This is the key role of the first responders. When officers arrive at a scene of any potential haz-mat incident , or a scene where persons are down or visibly affected by an unknown cause, the officers must refrain from rushing into the scene. The first responders must determine the upwind side of the incident and reposition themselves to this area, keeping in mind that an area which appears clear still may not be safe.
    • 2.Evacuate - First responders will limit their attempts to evacuate the hot zone and areas likely to be contaminated to verbal direction from a safe area. The Fire Department will conduct all evacuations within the restricted zone, in instances not involving an active criminal threat. The Incident Commander may authorize properly protected members of the Critical Incident Response Team to assist in this function. Evacuations beyond the safe area must be authorized by the CFD Incident Commander.
    • 3.Isolate / Location - Although this is the primary responsibility of Department members, this function takes place in three distinct phases:
      • a.the first responders shall initiate a semi-circle buffer and, if manpower resources allow, establish an access route.
      • b.the Fire Department has the initial responsibility to determine the downwind side of the perimeter.
      • c.the Incident Commander in consultation with the ranking on-site CFD supervisor will determine the safe zone prior to Department members assuming responsibility for establishing a full outer perimeter. Security teams will be assigned specific duties in controlling access by the Incident Commander , in those areas the ranking on-site CFD supervisor has deemed safe for Department personnel.
        NOTE:
        These procedures do not prohibit the Incident Commander from establishing posts to restrict citizen approach on the downwind side of an incident at distances sufficient to ensure the safety of officers and members of the public.
    • 4.Isolate / Persons - First responders will not enter the hot zone to extract persons unless necessary to neutralize any active criminal threat. Persons emerging from the hot zone will be isolated for responding emergency medical teams. Unprotected Department personnel must refrain from direct contact with affected persons. In addition, persons with possible exposure will also be isolated in a portion of the restricted area or safe area, to be relocated to the decontamination area at the direction of the ranking on-site CFD supervisor.
IX.Scene Responsibilities
  • A.Sworn members will not unreasonably endanger themselves or another to conform to the procedures of this directive.
  • B.The following are the procedures that will provide the framework to mitigate a critical incident . For the procedures in regards to a specific type of critical incident , Department members will refer to Item III of this directive.
  • C.First Responders
    • 1.The evaluation made by the first officer on the scene impacts the entire emergency response.
      • a.When responding to a possible haz-mat incident , Department members must make observations of atmospheric conditions and signs of contamination well in advance of arriving at the incident location.
      • b.When discovering a possible haz-mat incident , Department members must act quickly to prevent themselves from being over-exposed to the danger.
    • 2.When responding to the scene, Department members will maintain vigilance by:
      • a.evaluating the extent of the situation;
      • b.approaching the scene cautiously, refraining from rushing in;
      • c.considering the location entry points and all unknown materials as hazardous;
      • d.if possible and appropriate, determining offender line of fire and/or wind direction, and relaying this information to OEMC and responding units;
        NOTE:
        Responding units will approach the scene from the safest possible direction.
      • e.providing access to the scene for other responding emergency vehicles.
    • 3.The first officer on the scene, if applicable:
      • a.will determine if there is a critical incident taking place.
      • b.will determine the hazard (person or material) and location of the incident and immediately communicate that information to OEMC and responding units.
      • c.will initiate any essential duties immediately until formally relieved on the scene by a Bureau of Patrol supervisor.
      • d.must determine the upwind side of the event and relocate to this position.
      • e.will immediately notify OEMC of the situation encountered and location of the upwind side, request the CFD Hazardous Incident Team, a supervisor, and any other emergency resources needed.
      • f.will initiate the formation of a semi-circle buffer on the upwind side of the incident, directing the responding officers to areas where they will not be exposed to contaminants.
      • g.will immediately, upon the arrival of the first assist units, form a contact team , and as a team, mitigate the threat to prevent, as much as possible, further injury or damage.
      • h.must continue to evaluate conditions for change and update OEMC with observations made.
      • i.will assume the role of the Incident Commander until formally relieved on scene by a Bureau of Patrol supervisor.
  • D.First on-site supervisor
    The first on-site supervisor acting as the supervisor not assigned to a contact team will, if applicable:
    • 1.immediately determine the location of the first responding officers.
    • 2.manage the available on-scene resources and request additional resources as necessary.
    • 3.designate additional contact teams and establish and maintain radio contact with the contact teams when necessary.
      NOTE:
      If the first responding supervisor is part of a contact team , OEMC will assign an additional supervisor to assume the role of the Incident Commander until relieved by the appropriate highest ranking supervisor on-scene.
    • 4.designate a security team which will, as a team enter the site and secure a protected area when necessary. The designated security team leader will:
      • a.enter and manage the protected area .
      • b.continually assess the protected area for expansion. If the situation dictates (i.e., location of victims; available resources), the protected area will be expanded by clearing additional areas and posting officers to secure the newly designated boundaries.
      • c.maintain communication with established contact teams , if CFD is not the lead agency in charge, to provide any additional information on victims, expansion of the protected area , and any other pertinent information.
      • d.establish casualty collection points (CCP) within the protected area, as needed.
    • 5.establish a forward command post (FCP) within the inner perimeter when secured.
    • 6.ensure a clear access route is maintained for medical personnel to the casualty collection point (CCP) and contact OEMC to ensure an outer perimeter is established.
    • 7.allow CFD members to enter into the protected area, for treatment and removal of the critically injured, if CFD is not the lead agency in charge.
    • 8.ensure a Department member is designated to complete any applicable case reports.
    • 9.assume the role of the Incident Commander until officially relieved by a member of higher rank.
    • 10.once relieved as the Incident Commander , remain in command in any established forward command post (FCP) to coordinate the efforts of the of the protected area, the casualty collection point (CCP) , and a clear access route, if CFD is not the lead agency in charge. If this supervisor needs to enter the location as part of a contact team , OEMC will assign an additional supervisor to the forward command post (FCP) .
      NOTE:
      If CFD is the lead agency in charge, the first on-site supervisor will assist the ranking on-site CFD supervisor with essential duties, until further directed.
  • E.Initial Incident Commander
    The first on-site supervisor designated as the Incident Commander , if applicable, will:
    • 1.formally relieve the acting Incident Commander and have OEMC inform the field units of the change in command once physically present on the scene. Bureau of Patrol command structure will be followed.
    • 2.establish immediate priorities such as:
      • a.mitigating the dangers presented to first responders,
      • b.ensuring a full perimeter is being expanded in the safe area,
      • c.ensuring that an access route has been established,
      • d.ensuring any necessary traffic and crowd control is established,
      • e.ensuring that adequate Department manpower has been requested, and
      • f.ensuring an investigation as to the possible containment and cause has been initiated.
    • 3.confer with the ranking on-site CFD supervisor to determine the boundaries of the inner and outer perimeter and notify OEMC. The Incident Commander will then direct responding units to assume the role of security teams and expand the initial semi-circle buffer into a full perimeter within the safe area .
    • 4.upon the arrival of the CFD's Command Van, or the establishment of the CFD Command Post, the Incident Commander will establish a command post and mobilization area adjacent to that location to direct police activities, conferring regularly with the ranking on-site CFD supervisor.
    • 5.confer with the ranking on-site CFD supervisor and identify a decontamination area and EMS triage area , notify OEMC, and coordinate the treatment of the injured with the ranking on-site CFD supervisor.
    • 6.determine incident objectives and strategies to establish control of the critical incident.
    • 7.designate a communications car to be assigned to the mobilization area . The supervisor will ensure the communications car continually documents:
      • a.the locations of injured members of the public and officers within and around the location;
      • b.the beat number and time of arrival of each responding unit;
      • c.the nature and time of all supervisory requests and notifications; and
      • d.other significant events or pertinent information.
    • 8.designate an intelligence team , which will, as a team:
      • a.proceed to the site's information area ;
      • b.obtain any necessary intelligence information (i.e., subject identification, video surveillance, floor plans, aerial maps, entry and exit points, keys to access any secured areas within the location, etc.); and
      • c.collect any pertinent information involving the incident, gather information from the forward command post (FCP) , and continue to notify OEMC and the Incident Commander of the status of the incident.
    • 9.obtain the Safe School Information Package , if the incident location is school related.
    • 10.ensure incident safety for all responding personnel while maintaining discipline in the use of firearms.
    • 11.ensure for any persons taken into custody Department members follow the procedures delineated in the Department directive entitled "Processing Persons Under Department Control."
    • 12.identify and secure a victim area for the incident's victims, notify OEMC, and ensure the adequate personnel are provided for any necessary evacuations.
    • 13.determine if a line of communications has been established with an intelligence officer or on-site security officers. Upon establishing communication, gather intelligence from the information area as to the number and location of victims as well as any information regarding any assailants in criminal instances.
    • 14.determine if a line of communication has been established with all necessary participants to gather intelligence.
    • 15.assign personnel to ensure that access routes are open for responding personnel.
    • 16.ensure a media briefing area and a family briefing area is established and notify OEMC.
  • F.District Station Supervisor
    Upon notification of a confirmed critical incident, the district station supervisor in the district of occurrence, if appropriate, will:
    • 1.ensure that telephone contact with the affected site's administrative or security office is established by district desk personnel to gather intelligence information for the on-site Incident Commander if applicable. If possible, communication with the affected site will be maintained for the purpose of a threat assessment.
    • 2.promptly notify the watch operations lieutenant, the district commander, and the appropriate area deputy chief, Bureau of Patrol.
    • 3.obtain any pertinent safety information regarding the location, including information from the Facility Information Management System (FIMS) or the Safe School Information Package .
    • 4.document all relevant information on the Watch Incident Log (CPD-21.916).
  • G.Field Lieutenant/Watch Operations Lieutenant
    The designated lieutenant will, if applicable:
    • 1.respond to the scene and formally assume the role of Incident Commander until relieved by a member of highest rank from the Bureau of Patrol.
    • 2.ensure that all duties listed in Items IX-A through IX-F of this directive have been completed.
    • 3.determine if there is adequate manpower on and responding to the scene.
      NOTE:
      The designated lieutenant will ensure responding Department members check-in using the ICS 211 Incident Check-In Form and the ICS 211-M Mobilization Check-In Form.
    • 4.ensure that a leader is designated for a contact team , security team , and the intelligence team .
    • 5.ensure that a manager is designated to each of the following tasks or locations to supervise the:
      • a.movement and safe evacuations of victims, ensuring that there is adequate personnel to safely move all evacuees and secure the victim area .
      • b.coordination of efforts at the mobilization area , including directing responding assist units as to their roles and locations of assignments.
      NOTE:
      These tasks will be done in coordination with the CFD, when applicable.
  • H.District Commander
    The district commander will:
    • 1.respond to the scene of all confirmed critical incidents and formally assume the role as Incident Commander unless relieved by the Street Deputy.
    • 2.ensure all duties listed in Items IX-A through IX-G of this directive are complete.
    • 3.submit a Recorded Voice Transmissions Request Form (OEMC-109) to OEMC at the completion of the incident.
    NOTE:
    When the district commander is unavailable and the district executive officer is available, the district executive officer will assume the duties of the district commander.
  • I.Street Deputy
    The on-duty Street Deputy, will:
    • 1.respond to all confirmed critical incidents .
    • 2.upon arrival, formally assume the role as Incident Commander and ensure that all duties listed in Items IX-A through IX-H of this directive are completed, unless relieved by a higher ranking member.
    • 3.establish the level of organization needed; if necessary, designate any or all of the following:
      • a.an operations section commanding officer;
      • b.a planning section commanding officer;
      • c.a logistics section commanding officer; and
      • d.a finance section commanding officer.
    • 4.notify any additional command staff members, as appropriate.
  • J.Office of Emergency Management and Communications (OEMC)
    OEMC will:
    • 1.upon notification of any critical incident :
      • a.assign, at minimum, four (4) officers;
      • b.assign a Bureau of Patrol field sergeant. If available, the sergeant will be from the district of occurrence; and
      • c.simulcast the dispatch via Citywide 1, clearly stating the location of the incident, the type of incident, and the location type.
    • 2.upon notification of a confirmed critical incident ,either through first responding officers or members of the community calling 911:
      • a.assign additional district personnel to form any required contact team , security team , and intelligence team , as necessary;
      • b.assign the following district personnel to report to the mobilization area :
        • (1)an additional field supervisor, and
        • (2)all available personnel, including supervisors.
      • c.simulcast over Citywide 1 the occurrence of a confirmed critical incident and provide the location, type of incident, and location type, requesting that any necessary personnel including available SWAT personnel and district emergency incident team personnel respond.
      • d.notify the SWAT Unit 24-hour desk.
      • e.dispatch EMS, as needed.
      • f.notify the following units, detailing the circumstances, mobilization area , command post , and any other pertinent information:
        • (1)the Crime Prevention and Information Center (CPIC);
        • (2)the appropriate district commander;
        • (3)the appropriate area, deputy chief, Bureau of Patrol;
        • (4)the district station supervisor of the district of occurrence;
        • (5)the Bomb Squad;
        • (6)the Special Functions Division;
        • (7)the Forensic Services Division;
        • (8)the appropriate Bureau of Detectives area;
        • (9)the Office of Communications;
        • (10)any other city department or agency that may need to respond to the incident (e.g., ComEd, Chicago Board of Education Emergency Control Center, People's Gas); and
        • (11)the Office of the Mayor.
      • g.switch the primary communications to an alternate citywide channel, if appropriate.
      • h.maintain a running record indicating the following locations and information:
        • (1)current and all previously assigned as the Incident Commander and the ranking on-site CFD supervisor;
        • (2)the information area ;
        • (3)the mobilization area ;
        • (4)the command post ;
        • (5)the inner and outer perimeters ;
        • (6)the casualty collection point (CCP) ;
        • (7)the protected area ;
        • (8)the forward command post (FCP) ;
        • (9)the access route ;
        • (10)the decontamination area ;
        • (11)the EMS triage area ;
        • (12)the isolated area ;
        • (13)the victim area ;
        • (14)the media briefing area ;
        • (15)the family briefing area ; and
        • (16)the location of injured civilians, police, and fire personnel.
  • K.Support Personnel
    Upon notification of a confirmed critical incident , outside assisting units will operate, as appropriate, in the following manner:
    • 1.All available SWAT personnel will, as requested:
      • a.respond to the scene, notifying the appropriate radio zone, and providing their beat number and estimated time of arrival; and
      • b.upon arrival at the scene, report to the supervisor at the command post .
    • 2.The Special Functions Division will:
      • a.identify all available personnel within the unit and assign the appropriate units to respond to the scene, (e.g., command van); and
      • b.notify the Incident Commander of the number of officers placed on radio alert.
    • 3.The commanding officer of the Bomb Squad will ensure that two explosive technicians are assigned to respond to the scene.
    • 4.The appropriate Bureau of Detectives area will assign a sergeant and a team of detectives who will respond to the scene. The team will interview any victims and witnesses for the follow-up investigation at the victim area .
    • 5.The Commander, Forensics Services Division, will ensure the assignment of a supervisor and Mobile Incident Response Vehicle (MIRV) personnel to respond to the scene. The responding Forensic Services Division supervisor will determine, in coordination with the responding Bureau of Detectives supervisor, the need for the deployment of Crime Scene Investigation Unit personnel.
  • L.Crime Prevention and Information Center (CPIC)
    CPIC will, as appropriate:
    • 1.serve as the Department's Fusion Center.
    • 2.gather, process, analyze, and share information and intelligence related to a critical incident .
    • 3.process requests for a mutual aid ILEAS response into the City of Chicago consistent with the Department directive entitle "Illinois Law Enforcement Alarm System," and coordinate with OEMC when necessary.
    • 4.follow any applicable procedures for a critical incident response delineated in the Department directive entitled "Crime Prevention and Information Center (CPIC)."
  • M.The Bureau of Technical Services
    The Bureau of Technical Services will be responsible for any technical functions related to a critical incident including but not limited to:
    • 1.coordinating with OEMC and procuring any additional resources, such as transportation, equipment, and supplies, as requested by the Incident Commander , if necessary;
    • 2.issuing PPE and replacement radios and/or batteries; and
    • 3.conducting any maintenance and/or decontamination procedures for Department vehicles.
  • N.The Bureau of Organizational Development
    The Bureau of Organizational Development will be responsible for any administrative functions related to a critical incident , including but not limited to:
    • 1.issuing a special event number to accurately track and record overtime for Department personnel;
    • 2.providing an analysis of all injuries and medical treatment of Department members; and
    • 3.recording all expenses and providing a cost analysis of a critical incident .
X.Demobilization
Planning for demobilization will occur prior to the end of the incident. The Incident Commander will consult the ranking on-site CFD supervisor and ensure post-incident demobilization procedures include, but are not limited to:
  • A.accounting for all Department members involved in the incident;
  • B.relieving officers of their assigned duties, as appropriate;
  • C.assigning Department members, as needed, to remain in the area of the incident to ensure that it is protected;
  • D.deactivating any established operational posts/areas; and
  • E.accounting for all Department equipment used during the incident.
XI.Exposure to Hazardous Materials
  • A.All department members who were exposed to a hazardous material will notify their supervisor at the scene of the incident, as soon as practical. The supervisor will ensure that the Incident Commander is made aware and that Department members are decontaminated following the directions of the ranking on-site CFD supervisor. The provisions of the Department directive entitled "Hazardous Material Incidents" will be followed for documenting the incident. Contaminated members must refrain from entering uncontaminated vehicles, and are reminded that all equipment which was exposed must be decontaminated at the designated location prior to being restored to duty.
  • B.Members of Critical Incident Response Teams will not remove exposed equipment until ordered into the decontamination area . Supervisors will ensure that all equipment is removed and decontaminated or disposed of in accordance with the direction of the ranking on-site CFD supervisor. The Critical Incident Coordinator will assist supervisors in the decontamination procedure. In the absence of the Critical Incident Coordinator , the highest ranking designated supervisor on the scene will ensure adherence to safe procedures and compliance with the directions of the ranking on-site CFD supervisor.
  • C.No officer is relieved from a bona fide Critical Incident until the Incident Commander has expressly authorized the relief.
XII.Post-Incident Evaluation
  • A.The district commander of the district of occurrence and the Incident Commander will, as appropriate;
    • 1.convene a debriefing session with the appropriate involved supervisory members as soon as practical following the incident and forward a summary after action To-From-Subject report to the First Deputy Superintendent. The after- action report will contain three sections as follows:
      • a.Section One will contain general and administrative matters. This section should include, but is not limited to, the following information:
        • (1)dates and places of assembly and difficulties, if any,
        • (2)dates and places of operations involved in,
        • (3)strength reports to include the number of personnel and their districts/units and vehicles involved, and
        • (4)the identification of other personnel involved such as National Guard, FBI, Cook County Sheriff, Illinois State Police, etc.
      • b.Section Two will contain operations and activities and will be a chronological account of operations. This section should include, but is not limited to, the following information:
        • (1)facts concerning the initial response to the critical incident, including decisions made and reasons for these decisions such as what happened, where, how, and why,
        • (2)all confrontations should be described in detail such as where, when, how many, what personnel responded, command actions, group actions, and the results,
        • (3)equipment used and estimate of need for more supplies, and
        • (4)If any tactical or technical improvisation was used, describe and indicate the results.
      • c.Section Three will contain observations, evaluations, and recommendations. Recommendations should be grouped under functional headings such as personnel operations, training, organization, information and logistics, and a potential liability assessment.
      :
      Material for this report should be kept on a daily basis by each level of command. One method which may be used is the Supervisor's Management Log (CPD-11.455).
    • 2.ensure all copies of all Bureau of Patrol reports pertaining to the incident and the after incident report are forwarded to the First Deputy Superintendent no later than seven (7) days after the incident.
  • B.The appropriate Bureau of Detectives area and the commanding officer of the Arson Section will, as appropriate, ensure that a copy of all reports pertaining to the incident are forwarded to the First Deputy Superintendent when completed.
  • C.Upon receipt of a Recorded Voice Transmission Request, OEMC will forward the following information to each bureau chief, within seven (7) days after the incident:
    • 1.the event history of the entire incident.
    • 2.the audio recording of the entire incident.
  • D.The First Deputy Superintendent will convene with the Deputy Chief, Education and Training Division and, as appropriate, evaluate the incident and determine the need for supplemental training and dissemination of reports and materials to the appropriate command staff personnel.
XIII.Conflict Resolution
If any procedure of this directive conflicts with any Department directive, this directive will take precedent.
Eddie T. Johnson
Superintendent of Police
16-010 RCL/TPF
GLOSSARY TERMS:
1. -
An emergency situation, other than civil disorder, of such impact or potential impact that a disastrous loss of life, property, or disruption to the community has occurred or may occur. This term is a declaration made to implement the Critical Incident Response Program and may be applied to a disaster scene or hazardous material incident.
2. -
An incident involving exposure or potential exposure to any substance which, due to its nature or condition, poses or may pose an unreasonable risk to health, safety, or the environment, commonly referred to as a haz-mat incident. The CFD designates three classifications for all haz-mat incidents:
  • A.LEVEL I - The minimum initial response by the CFD's Hazardous Incident Team to any suspected or potential haz-mat incident. The primary focus is to investigate and/or mitigate incidents involving materials with minor potential impact.
  • B.LEVEL II - A confirmed incident involving a larger quantity of material with a moderate or high potential impact; or an incident which requires protective clothing; or an incident which requires evacuation of the surrounding area.
  • C.LEVEL III - An extensive incident which may require additional manpower, more resources than are normally deployed with the CFD Hazardous Incident Team Task Force, and/or involve an expanded evacuation area.
3. -
Responsible for the overall response to the incident, including the use of resources, development of strategies, and incident operations.
  • A.(Active Shooter Incident) The on-site Department member in overall command of the incident who is responsible for the implementation of the Active Shooter Incident Plan.
  • B.(Critical Incident) The highest-ranking on-site Department member responsible for the Chicago Police Department's overall response to a critical incident.
  • C.(Haz-mat) The highest ranking fire official at the scene of a haz-mat incident.
4. -
Specialized equipment including breathing apparatus, articles of clothing, and functional equipment issued by the Department which are intended to protect the member from limited exposure to harmful hazards and substances.
5. -
A supervisor designated by the Chief, Bureau of Patrol, to coordinate administrative and training matters relating to the Critical Incident Program. The Critical Incident Coordinator will respond to critical incident scenes, whenever possible, to assist the Department's Incident Commander. The Chief may designate up to two additional supervisors to provide relief for this function.
6. -
An access route shall be clearly defined and kept open for the unrestricted passing of emergency vehicles. This route will be used for emergency evacuation in the event the incident escalates.
7. -
  • A.(SWAT/Critical Incidents) A secure location where all responding units will report for briefing, assignment, and equipment and a location designated for use as a stand-by location for personnel not actually committed to responsibilities at the incident. The manager whose primary function is to provide intelligence and direction to responding units, is designated by the Incident Commander.
  • B.(Hazardous Material Incident (Haz-Mat)) A location designated for use as a stand-by location for personnel not actually committed to responsibilities at the incident.
8. -
The area that immediately surrounds the hot zone. This area is considered to be dangerous to health due to the proximity to the threat. This area is restricted to personnel with the proper protective clothing and equipment. The upwind side may be designated by the Incident Commander for the Decontamination and Isolation Areas.
9. -
A location, designated within the Protected Area, where critically injured would be assembled for urgent critical care while waiting on evacuation. The casualty collection points should be secure locations that are accessible to CFD members yet close enough to the point of injury to minimize physical transportation of the critically injured.
10. -
In haz-mat situations, an area usually located within the restricted zone and on the upwind side, that is used to physically remove or neutralize contaminants from victims, response personnel, apparatus, and equipment.
11. -
A secure position where the Chicago Fire Department (CFD) will establish a triage area and/or where persons leaving the decontamination area are medically evaluated by emergency medical services personnel.
12. -
A secure position outside the inner perimeter for the briefing of victim's family members by Department personnel.
13. -
A secured location near the outside of the structure or protected area designated by the FIRST supervisor on-scene not assigned to a contact team, that is used to support the protected area and casuality collection point.
14. -
The area in which there is an immediate threat to life. First responders will not enter the hot zone when there is a presumption of any haz-mat exposure.
15. -
  • A.(Crime Scene) The immediate area within the outer perimeter of a crime scene where evidentiary material is likely to be collected. This area will be secured with red crime scene barrier tape, imprinted with the legend "DO NOT ENTER" or "DANGER - DO NOT ENTER".
  • B.(General Incident) The immediate area of containment as designated by the incident commander.
  • C.(Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Incidents) The immediate area of containment as designated by the incident commander. This area is initially manned by responding beat personnel until relieved by members of the containment team.
16. -
In haz-mat situations, an area located on the upwind side of the incident for the exclusive use of the CFD Hazardous Incident Team to set up and prepare for mitigation of the incident.
17. -
An area designated for the media to assemble and receive information concerning the incident.
18. -
  • A.(Crime Scene) The area of a crime scene extending large enough for field personnel to conduct a thorough investigation. This area will be secured with yellow crime scene barrier tape. The outer perimeter will encompass the inner perimeter.
  • B.(General/SWAT Incident) A peripheral control area surrounding the inner perimeter, providing a safe zone for access to the inner perimeter as well as defining the limit of access by unauthorized persons.
19. -
A command post can be devised for various types of incidents:
  • A.(SWAT Incident/Critical Incident/Active Shooter Incident) A secure position within the outer perimeter from which the Incident Commander directs operations.
  • B.(Hazardous Material Incident (Haz-Mat)) A secure position outside the restricted area from which the highest ranking on-scene Department member directs police operations, generally adjacent to the Chicago Fire Department (CFD) Command Van. The highest ranking on-scene Department member, if a Bureau of Patrol Area Deputy Chief, Street Deputy, or above, may authorize the use of the Department's Mobile Command Post when deemed appropriate and available.
20. -
The area surrounding the restricted zone that is believed to be free of contamination and potential peril.
21. -
A restrictive formation established on the upwind side of an incident by the initial police responders on first approach to the area of a potential hazardous material situation (haz-mat).
22. -
A secure location near the incident site where victims can be transported.
23. -
  • A.(Active Shooter) A team of multiple officers designated by the FIRST supervisor on-scene not assigned to a contact team that responds to an active shooter incident. The team enters the location of the incident and establishes and provides security to the Protected Area.
  • B.(Critical Incidents) Multiple officers whose designated duties are limited to establishing and maintaining the protected area, inner and outer perimeters, and access routes.
24. -
  • A.(Active Shooter) A team of two to five officers that responds to an active shooter incident and, as a team, enters the location of the incident and begins an active search to locate, isolate, secure, and neutralize the assailant(s).
  • B.(Critical Incident) A team of two to five officers that responds to a critical incident and as a team, enters the location of the critical incident to locate, isolate, secure, and neutralize any critical threats, and locate and render aid to involved victims.
25. -
A secure area within the incident scene/structure where victims are located or transported to where medical personnel will provide urgent care for the critically injured. The Protected Area may continually expand as the situation dictates (i.e., location of victims, available resources, etc), by clearing additional areas and posting officers to secure the newly designated boundaries.
26. -
The use of physical or chemical means to remove, deactivate or destroy blood-borne pathogens on a surface or item to the point where they are no longer capable of transmitting infectious particles.
27. -
A team of officers that responds to an active shooter/critical incident and, as a team, proceeds to the location's information area.
28. -
  • A.A secure area within or in close proximity to the incident site where additional information can be obtained to assist responding officers.
    NOTE:
    This may be a security office, administrator's office, or engineer's office and this information area may be a distance away from where the violent incident or emergency is occurring or where the assailant(s) is located.
29. -
A package that contains information on a particular school including, but not limited to, the Safe School Plan Information Sheet, floor plans for the school buildings, and a map of the surrounding area.
30. -
A database used within the CLEAR System as the depository for information on locations throughout the City of Chicago. Information stored in FIMS includes, but is not limited to, contact information of key personnel, information about the location structure and contents, and plans and/or photographs of the location. Information in FIMS is accessible on a need to know basis to personnel approved by the Commander, Deployment Operations Center Section.
31. -
Individuals within ICS organizational units that are assigned specific managerial responsibilities, eg., mobilization area.